Kate Atkin Photography

  • Exploring Italy: Pisa

    The Leaning Tower of Pisa shot from below and also a view from the top

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  • Exploring Italy: Florence Part 2

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  • Exploring Italy: Florence Part 1

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  • Cyanotypes

    The cyanotype process is simple. It can be done easily in a few steps:

    The cyanotype is made up of two simple solutions. Potassium ferricyanide and Ferric ammonium citrate (green) are mixed with water separately. The two solutions are then blended together in equal parts.

    Paper, card, textiles or any other naturally absorbent material is coated with the solution and dried in the dark. Objects or negatives are placed on the material to make a print. The cyanotype is printed using UV light, such as the sun, a light box or a UV lamp.

    After exposure the material is processed by simply rinsing it in water. A white print emerges on a blue background. The final print is dried and admired.

    The prints below were made by placing plants and flowers onto coated paper and exposing in the natural sunlight.

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  • Liquid Emulsion; A Series of images printed on Silver Birch

    I created this series of work using liquid emulsion applied to the bark of Silver Birch. The emulsion is a silver-based sensitizer which I painted onto the bark in a darkroom and exposed using an enlarger and then developed in conventional chemistry. This emulsion can be used to coat a wide variety of surfaces making the possibilities endless! I love how the texture of the bark has become part of the original image, the dancers seem ghostly, impregnated onto the decaying form of the birch.

    For further details on the process of using liquid emulsion www.alternativephotography.com is a really useful source of information.

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  • My little Mexican friend

    Mexico is literally full of these lovely creatures! Some can grow to nearly 5ft but they're ever so friendly, especially if you have some fruit in your pocket!

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  • Flamenco; A Series in Albumen

    Albumen is a traditional process in photography that I have always been fascinated by. Invented in 1850, it was the first commercially exploitable method of producing a photographic print on a paper base from a negative. The process uses an emulsion of egg white (albumen) and salt (sodium chloride or ammonium chloride) coated onto a piece of paper and then dried. The paper is then coated in a solution of silver nitrate and water, making the surface sensitive to UV light. I created this series of work by placing negatives of a Flamenco dancer onto canvas and exposing under a UV lightbox.

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  • Polaroid Transfers: The Vienna Festival Ballet

    This series of work was created by peeling apart polaroid films. This technique allows the separation of a developed print to join another surface, in this case watercolour paper. In the transfer I have taken the negative portion whilst still in development and, using a brayer, pressed the image onto my desired surface. Polaroid transfers have a unique visual style that is a little ghostly, a little impressionistic, and often very moody.

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